2007, good year for Moore’s Law

IBM ended a brilliant 2007 with the news about a silicon Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator the smallest electro-optic modulator yet, that will allow the connection of multiple processing cores inside a chip by using beams of light, instead of wires. This certainly will help to extend the longevity of Moore’s Law, and IBM knows it:

IBM’s pioneering work to move the industry from aluminum to copper wiring, unveiled in 1997, gave the industry an immediate 35 percent reduction in electron flow resistance and a 15 percent boost in chip performance.

Since then, IBM scientists have continued to drive performance improvements to continue the path of Moore’s Law. And in 2007 alone, IBM announced:

High-k metal gates (January 2007): a solution to one of the industry’s most vexing problems — transistors that leak current. By using new materials IBM will create chips with “high-k metal gates” that will enable products with better performance that are both smaller and more power efficient.

eDRAM (February 2007) – By replacing SRAM with an innovative new type of speedy DRAM on a microprocessor chip, IBM will be able to more than triple the amount of embedded memory and boost performance significantly.

3-D Chip Stacking (April 2007) – IBM announces the creation of three-dimensional chips using “through-silicon vias,” allowing semiconductors to be stacked vertically instead of being placed near each other horizontally. This cuts the length of critical circuit pathways by up to 1,000 times.

Airgap (May 2007) – Using a “self assembly” nanotechnology IBM has created a vacuum between the miles of wire inside a Power Architecture microprocessor reducing unwanted capacitance and improving both performance and power efficiency.
IBM’s pioneering work to move the industry from aluminum to copper wiring, unveiled in 1997, gave the industry an immediate 35 percent reduction in electron flow resistance and a 15 percent boost in chip performance.

Ditto

Moore’s law keeps going and going and going…

As Mark Twain would have said: Rumours on the demise of Moore’s law are somewhat exaggerated.
Several breakthroughs in chip-making technology coming in recent months from IBM Research Labs seem to augur an extended lease on life for Moore’s dictum.

Co-founder of Intel Gordon Moore observed in 1965 that the number of transistor in a chip doubles, roughly, every two years and predicted that this trend will continue in the future. Since then, advances in chip-making have been closely following his prediction

Beyond Silicon

A breakthrough in material technologies that can extend Moore’s Law for a few more years.

Speaking about the successful creation of a metal-insulator-metal diode, Douglas Keszler a distinguished professor of chemistry at Oregon State University said

“This is a fundamental change in the way you could produce electronic products, at high speed on a huge scale at very low cost, even less than with conventional methods. It’s a basic way to eliminate the current speed limitations of electrons that have to move through materials.”

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