Fingerprinting Computers – Part II – Hardware


The fingerprinting of a computer using data accessible or generated by software is subjected to a Replay attack or could be easily disrupted by malware. This method should not be used to authenticate the machine.
In order to defeat Replay attacks, the fingerprinting algorithm needs to generate a one time string, based on some unique property of the hardware and that can be used by the verifier to check the identity of the computer.
One example of such technology is the Intel IPT (Identity Protection Technology) that works by generating a unique 6 digit number every 30 seconds. This number is generated by a section of the chip that is inaccessible to the Operating system and holds some secret key shared with the validator/server. Once a particular processor is linked to a server, the server will be able to identify the CPU and validate the computer. Of course this does not imply user authentication and the intended use of this technology is as an additional factor on a multi-factor authentication scheme.
A Public Key infrastructure (Certificate Authority) is still needed to defeat the Man in the Middle attack.
Technologies that can identify hardware to the chip level are being developed to prevent counterfeiting. These are based on the PUF (Physically Unclonable Functions) that use physical variations of the circuit to extract certain parameters that are unique to each chip and cannot be reproduced nor manipulated without physically tampering with the circuit.
Related:
Power-up of a SRAM as a source of Entropy and Identification
Secure Processors, the ultimate battlefield
A PUF Design for Secure FPGA-Based Embedded Systems

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Fingerprinting Computers – Part I – Your browser.

Authentication is about the only big open problem in the practice of internet security. The existing encryption and hashing algorithms as well as the key generation/management protocols offer a high degree of security, barring programming/implementation errors.
Authentication technologies face serious challenges mainly because identity is difficult to establish with a 100% certainty even using physical characteristics, i.e., signatures and credentials can be forged, the physical appearance of people can be manipulated, etc.
Read more of this post

Page on authentication added

I’ve added a page on authentication that sums up several posts and put them in one place.
Check it out on the right side under “Look Inside”

Check the strength of passwords

A cool application for checking the strength of passwords

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Open letter to Mr. Phisher

I received a very amusing e-mail today:

Hello,
It is with profound sense of sadness i wrote this email to you. I don’t know how you will find this but you just have to forgive me for not telling you before leaving. I traveled down to United Kingdom Yesterday for a short vacation but unfortunately,i was mugged at a gun point on my way to the hotel i lodged all my money and all other vital documents including my credit card and my cell phone have been stolen by muggers.
I’ve been to the embassy and the Police here but they’re not helping issues at all,Things are difficult here and i don’t know what to do at the moment that why i email to ask if you can lend me £1,500.00 so i can settle the hotel bill and get a returning ticket back home. Please do me this great help and i promise to refund the money as soon as i get back home.
I look forward to your positive response.
Thanks

This coming supposedly coming from the Gmail of a fellow engineer that happens to live in my town and is at 2 degrees of separation from me in the LinkedIn network.

Sorry, Mr. Phisher, I don’t know the guy enough to send the funds, my bad for not being more proactive in extending my network, he was just a step away! (if he really is the one who set the account with his name). It will help your cause if you read the newspapers, for the last few days there have been no flights to or from London, you know, the volcano thing.

I heard stories of people getting similar e-mails from people they know, some of the stories may be more verisimilar even. The would be phishers make good use of the information that can be gathered from social networks to craft these targeted e-mails.

 

Google problems may have bigger problems than people creating accounts to send phishing e-mails.

 

The Random Matchmaker : Phone Company’s new by product.

A network glitch(?) that logs AT&T users into other people facebook accounts at random was reported today.

Who knows, in the future many kids could attribute their existence to a programming error. If so should we call it the Destiny_2.0 bug?

SSL 3.0 / TLS subjected to Man in the Middle Attack

An “Authentication Gap” was discovered in the latest version of SSL/TLS protocol.This could potentially be a huge problem. The gap is not due to some erroneous implementation, it is a property of the protocol.

Here is a list of links to websites where the issue is being followed:

http://www.phonefactor.com/sslgap/

IETF resources

Red Hat

SANS.org

More reviews for the AMS

I have a few new reviews of papers on cryptography in my updated page. For those interested in the security of NMAC and HMAC or affiliation hiding key exchanges, I recommend reading the reviews. They include links to relevant papers.

About the need to protect Biometric Data

An article stating the need to protect biometric data appeared in the IEEE spectrum magazine. Not a lot of new information, a good summary of the threats as biometrics are being used more and more as authenticators.

 

Power-up of a SRAM as a source of Entropy and Identification

Many years ago I was involved in a research project looking to use tiny differences in processing time inside a computer as a way to fingerprint the device. The idea was not unique, I guess that at the same time many were busy looking for similar things.

The reason was that in the framework of Internet security protocols such as SSL, if each party can fingerprint the other party’s computer, that will add another dimension to the development of a strong authentication scheme. Eventually the company supporting the research run out of interest and money and I forgot all about the idea until I recently read the news.

Enter the Fingerprint Extraction and Random Numers in SRAM (FERNS) method developed by Holcomb,  Burleson and Fu of the University of California Berkeley. They analyzed the initial state of the cells of a 512 kb Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) after power up and discovered that the stable states of some cells representing the bits were random, that is they have equal probability to be 1 or 0, while others cells were skewed to start as a 1 or as a 0. This property of the cells is due to imperfections of the fabrication process and are impossible to control.

A paper describing Burleson’s group work is going to appears in the IEEE Transactions on Computers.

From the Abstract
…..  We use experimental data from high performance SRAM, and the WISP UHF RFID tag to validate the principles behind FERNS. We demonstrate that 8 byte fingerprints from an SRAM chip are sufficient for uniquely identifying circuits among a population of 5,120 and extrapolate that 16 to 24 bytes of SRAM would be sufficient for uniquely identifying every instance of the SRAM ever produced. Using a smaller population, we demonstrate similar identifying ability from the embedded SRAM microcontroller memory of the WISP. In addition to identification, we show that SRAM fingerprints capture noise, enabling true random number generation. We demonstrate that the initial states of a 256 byte SRAM can produce 128 bit true random numbers capable of passing the NIST approximate entropy test.

The possibilities for the application of this technology to authentication and key generation schemes are enormous, specially in the field of portable devices. To have an entropy generator “in a chip” is great, if you get that together with a fingerprint of the chip is wonderful news. Certainly we’ll hear more about it.

 

Related reading: Quirks of RFID Memory Make for Cheap Security Scheme