The book gets excellent review at Amazon.com

A very nice surprise from the comment pages at Amazon.com, a 5 star rating for the Cryptography book authored by A. Bruen and myself.

The reviewer consider the book a Insightful Interdisciplinary Orientation on the subject, and gave this book the highest rating among similar books.

Thanks.

 

Bonus:

We are in good company too!

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Dark Fiber and White Space

Two underused resources, “Dark Fiber” and “White Space” are to be taken advantage of to increase the power of the network.

 

One application seeks to use optic fiber that has being laid but not being used to enable the establishment of secure keys using quantum technology http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/23317/page1/

The other is a wireless network in which the information is carried in the unused interstices of the TV spectrum. http://www.technologyreview.com/communications/23781/

Alan Turing


He deserved much better

National Post
14 Sep 2009

In the very distant future, the name of Alan Turing (1912-1954) will be among the very few for which the 20th century is remembered, long after most of the politicians, artists and celebrities have receded into confusion and oblivion. His stature is…read more…

ENIGMA encryption cracker Heroes

ENIGMA crackers reunite at Bletchley Park

I had the honour to meet one of them, now an emeritus math professor.

Check this article for pictures of the Turing Bombe the electronic-mechanical code-breaking machine used by the British to crack 3,000 Enigma messages a day during the Second World War.

Cryptool ver 1.4 has a very well done simulator of the ENIGMA machine encryption.

 

 

Waiting for the Quantum Leap

For the longest time I have the suspicion that quantum cryptography, although a neat idea, is overrated. I was keeping an eye into developments (see previous posts) just in case. currently my impression is that, with the current, technology, QC is an expensive proposition for the added value it provides. It looks like I am in good company on this. In the October issue of Wired, Bruce Schneier writes a commentary piece where he asserts:

While I like the science of quantum cryptography — my undergraduate degree was in physics — I don’t see any commercial value in it. I don’t believe it solves any security problem that needs solving. I don’t believe that it’s worth paying for, and I can’t imagine anyone but a few technophiles buying and deploying it. Systems that use it don’t magically become unbreakable, because the quantum part doesn’t address the weak points of the system.

Security is a chain; it’s as strong as the weakest link. Mathematical cryptography, as bad as it sometimes is, is the strongest link in most security chains. Our symmetric and public-key algorithms are pretty good, even though they’re not based on much rigorous mathematical theory. The real problems are elsewhere: computer security, network security, user interface and so on.

Moreover I have a nagging question about the fundamental tenet of quantum cryptography. The principle is that Alice and Bob will know for sure that Eve is eavesdropping in their channel because their bits will be changing as required by the uncertainty principle. Eve may be out of luck in getting the secrets as Bob and Alice will certainly decide not to exchange them in her presence. However, the mischievous Eve may decide that she is quite happy with only preventing the exchange. I will call this a denial of channel attack by which Eve can prevent Alice and Bob to exchange any secret until the police figures out where she is tapping the quantum line and force her to stop. Eve-hacker can now start a cat and mouse chase, that judging from the record on netting hackers by the internet police, is lopsided on Eve’s favor.

A mathematical note aside, Schneier mentions in his article the Bennet-Brassard and key reconciliation algorithms used by quantum cryptography. In a paper written with A. Bruen and D. Wehlau we gave rigurous proof of convergence for the Bennet-Bessete-Brassard-Salvail and Smolin (BBBSS92)method. These results and more about quantum cryptography also appear on the our book.